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Tiger revels in his play at the US Open

Tiger Woods is basking in the afterglow.

 No, he hasn't watched a tape of his victory at the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach Golf Links.

No, he hasn't had time to reflect on it.

No, he hasn't touched a golf club since that magical Sunday on the Monterey Peninsula.

Tiger Woods at the 2000 US Open. Allsport.

"I've been relaxing, getting away from it," Woods saidduring a teleconference in connection with the NEC Invitational, Aug. 24-27 in Akron, Ohio. "I don't know exactly what some of the records are. I don't know much about the tournament other than the fact that I won and I won by 15.

"I know that I played well and I know what I accomplished, but as far as the other records that they said I tied or broke, I really don't know what they are. That week was just a great week. I enjoyed my time there. I played a great tournament. It was nice to have things come together at the right time. But as far as reflecting, I really haven't had time to do that."

Woods returns to the PGA Tour next week for the Western Open in suburban Chicago. He'll leave for Great Britain immediately afterward for a week of practice and fun before the British Open at the Old Course at St. Andrews. There, he'll have a chance to become the fifth golfer to achieve the career grand slam. Woods is a prohibitive favorite to get the job done.
   
"It's hard for me to grasp the historical ramifications of what transpired (at Pebble Beach)," he said. "It's very reminiscent to Augusta (1997) because I didn't realize what I had done for another year afterwards, maybe two. It takes a little time for something like that to sink in."

Woods' victory at the 100th U.S. Open is being called one of the greatest sports achievements ever, and maybe the greatest.

"I think it's great that people are saying that because people are saying that golfers are athletes and that's kind of good," he said.

Woods hit 272 shots at Pebble Beach -- tying the U.S. Open record for fewest strokes -- and he said one easily stands above the rest. That was the second shot in the final round on the eighth hole, where he had 220 yards left to a tiny, concrete-hard green over a gorge.

"That's why you work so hard -- to see the shot come off exactly the way you want it to, to feel it, to see it," he said. "It's a game of misses. When you finally hit one right, feel absolutely everything you want to on a golf swing come together -- it happened once.

"I hit a 6-iron, with a 5-yard cut, and I wanted to land it 3 yards on the green. It landed just where I wanted to land it. Ben Hogan said you might hit four perfect shots a tournament if you're playing great. It rarely happens that you put everything together like that -- hit a shot on the number (distance), correct shape, how high you want to hit it, cut or draw, the divot -- it's a nice thing to do when it happens."

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