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US Open 2017 - Round 4 Reports - Scores

Brooks Koepka wins with record score

Brooks Koepka received a short piece of advice from a valuable source on the eve of the final round at the U.S. Open.

Defending champion Dustin Johnson was doing most of the talking.

''It was a long phone call for us - it was like two minutes,'' Koepka said. ''But he just said a few things, and just stay patient. And I'll win if I stay patient and just keep doing what I'm doing.''

What he did looked awfully familiar Sunday at Erin Hills, minus any mess involving the rules.

With athleticism and power, and four straight putts over the back nine that allowed him to pull away, Koepka capped off his hardscrabble journey around the world and found stardom at home as the U.S. Open champion.

He closed with a 5-under 67, only realizing after his par on the final hole that a birdie would have set yet another U.S. Open record in a week filled with them.

Koepka finished at 16-under 272, matching the lowest score to par first set by Rory McIlroy six years ago at Congressional.

Tied for the lead with six holes to play, Koepka holed an 8-foot par putt on the 13th hole that gave him confidence with his stroke and momentum to pour in birdies on the next three holes to turn the final hour into a celebration of another young star in golf.

The 27-year-old Koepka wound up winning by four shots over Brian Harman, who was done in by back-to-back bogeys right when Koepka was making his run, and Hideki Matsuyama, who closed with a 66.

''That's probably the most emotion I've ever shown coming down the stretch,'' Koepka said. ''It feels amazing to get my name on this trophy with so many other great names. It's truly an honor.''

Emotion? The most he displayed was a light fist pump, his hand clenched a little tighter with each birdie, and a double fist pump on the 18th when he tapped in for par.

It's not much different from Johnson.

They are close friends on the golf course and in the gym, and they play a similar game of power off the tee, a clean strike with the iron and a knack for looking calm even as the pressure is ramping up.

And now their names are on the U.S. Open trophy, one after the other.

It capped quite a journey for the Floridian. Without a card on any tour when Koepka got out of Florida State, he filled his passport on the Challenge Tour with stamps from Kazakhstan to Kenya, Scotland and Spain, India and the Madeira Island.

One night in Scotland, he called his agent and wanted to come home, even though he was leading the tournament. He had been on the road for so long, in so many different countries, and was feeling lonely. He won the next day to graduate to the European Tour. The next year, he earned a spot in the U.S. Open through a qualifier in England, and his tie for fourth at Pinehurst No. 2 helped him earn a card on the PGA Tour.

Koepka took it from there - a victory in Turkey against a strong field, his first PGA Tour victory in the Phoenix Open, his first Ryder Cup and now a major championship.

''To go over there, I think it helped me grow up a little bit and really figure out that, hey, play golf, get it done, and then you can really take this somewhere,'' he said.

Koepka became the seventh straight first-time winner of a major championship, and it was the first time since 1998-2000 that Americans won their national championship three straight years.

Tommy Fleetwood, who played alongside Koepka and closed with a 72 to finish fourth, played the Challenge Tour a year before Koepka arrived.

''It gives you a good grounding,'' Fleetwood said. ''Obviously, Brooks dealt with it amazingly. He came and kicked everyone's (behind) over there, didn't he? But he's proven for a long time how good he is. Now he's done it in a major.''

It was only fitting that Koepka left Erin Hills with yet another record matched or broken.

McIlroy finished at 16-under 268 when he won on rain-softened Congressional in the 2011 U.S. Open. But the low scoring went much deeper than that. Only six players had ever reached double digits under par in the previous 116 times at the U.S. Open. McIlroy and Tiger Woods (12 under at Pebble Beach in 2000) had been the only players to finish there.

This week alone, nine players reached at least 10 under and seven finished there.

Xander Schauffele, a rookie on the PGA Tour playing in his first U.S. Open, birdied his last hole for a 69 to tie for fifth at 10-under 268 along with Bill Haas (69) and Rickie Fowler (72), who was poised at yet another major to win only to fall back. Fowler started one shot out of the lead at the Masters this year and shot 76. He was only two behind when he made the turn, but bogeys on the 12th and 15th holes - and no birdies until No. 18 - ended his hopes.

Justin Thomas, coming off a 9-under 63 that matched the major championship scoring record and was the first 9-under round at a U.S. Open, went out in 39 and closed with a 75 to tie for ninth.

The week ended with 31 players under par, breaking the U.S. Open record of 28 players at Medinah in 1990. There were 133 sub-par rounds, nine more than the previous record in that 1990 U.S. Open.

Hideki Matsuyama closes with a 66

On the last day of the U.S. Open, Hideki Matsuyama was better than everyone else. Better than Brian Harman, Rickie Fowler, Justin Thomas and the rest of the congested leaderboard.

Just not good enough.

Matsuyama shot a 6-under 66 on Sunday to pull within one of the lead, but Brooks Koepka birdied three straight holes to pull away to his first major championship. The 25-year-old Japanese star had two of the best rounds of the tournament - he shot 65 on Friday - but a 2-over 74 in his opening round loomed large as the scores got lower and lower at a forgiving Erin Hills.

''You've got to put four good rounds together,'' Matsuyama said through an interpreter. ''I played two good rounds, but it wasn't enough.''

Matsuyama's 66 was the best score on a windy final day, one better than Koepka. The average score in the fourth round was 73.9.

But he had to settle for a tie for second with Harman, four strokes back of the champion.

''I played really well today,'' said Matsuyama, who watched Koepka close out his title on a TV in the clubhouse. ''Came up a little bit short. No regrets, but I did play well.''

Matsuyama got off to a fast start with three birdies in his first five holes, including a 41-foot putt from just off the green on No. 4. He was 2 under at the turn, and then really poured it on when he hit the back nine.

Matsuyama had five birdies and one bogey in his final eight holes. He set up a short birdie putt with a nice chip on 18, and then waited around for the leaders to finish.

''I learned a lot this week,'' he said. ''Hopefully, though, in the future, in majors, I can play in the either last or next to last group to give myself a better chance. But I'm happy with the way I played, and it gives me confidence going forward.''

It was Matsuyama's best finish in a major, another high in a topsy-turvy season.

He defended his title in the Waste Management Phoenix Open in February, beating Webb Simpson in a playoff at TPC Scottsdale. He also tied for 11th in the Masters, but his game dropped off a bit from there.

After tying for 45th at the Memorial last month, Matsuyama arrived at Erin Hills on a downturn. But he seemed to get back on track in the second round, with birdies on six of his first eight holes.

An uneven finish on Saturday also hurt his chances. He had three bogeys and two birdies on back nine, finishing with a 1-under 71.

''I'm glad the fairways were wide, but there were some really difficult holes out there, and I'm glad I played as well as I did,'' he said.

Brian Harman stumbles on back 9

Brian Harman's chance to become the first left-hander to win the U.S. Open slipped away early on the back nine.

He bogeyed the 12th and 13th holes. In the group ahead leader Brooks Koepka didn't slip up.

The leader going into the final round Sunday, Harman finished with an even-par 72 tie for second with Hideki Matsuyama at 12 under, four shots behind Koepka.

Harman dropped back on the back nine after going bogey-free on the final nine holes over his first three rounds.

''You've got to tip your cap. He went and won the golf tournament on the back nine,'' Harman said.

He said that he didn't believe in moral victories. Still, this was a pretty good weekend for the 30-year-old Harman, who was playing in just his eighth major. It was just the third time he made the cut.

A guy considered a short-hitter made quite an impression on the longest course in U.S. Open history. The 5-foot-7 Harman said he thrives on playing with what he calls a proverbial chip on his shoulder that dates to when he was a kid playing football.

''Yeah, I've never been a big, big man in any sport I've played,'' he said. ''Yeah, it's definitely something I draw upon.''

He showed spunk after holding off Dustin Johnson at the Wells Fargo Championship in May, a victory that secured Harman a spot at Erin Hills.

True to form, Harman didn't wither away on Sunday. either.

He birdied two of the next three holes following his bogeys on Nos. 12 and 13.

''I made the birdie right there at 14 ... then (Koepka) birdied 14, 15, 16,'' Harman said, ''and that was kind of lights out.''

Trailing by three shots at the 17th hole, Harman desperately needed to make a long birdie putt to keep alive his faint championship hopes. Up ahead, fans were cheering on Koepka.

Harman's 26-foot attempt from the edge of the green strayed left. He had to settle for par.

His tee shot at the 18th hole landed in a bunker. He looked dejected at times as he made his way up to the green, with Koepka's victory already assured. Harman ended up closing with a bogey.

''Good job,'' his wife, Kelly, said as she greeted her husband with a kiss.

Harman won the 2003 U.S. Junior Amateur. On Sunday, he picked up his sixth top-10 finish and third top-3 finish since joining the PGA Tour in 2012.

A couple fewer mistakes on the back nine might have given Harman a better chance at a major breakthrough.

''Yeah, if you had told me I was going to shoot 12 under this year at a U.S. Open and not win,'' he said, ''I would have taken the bet for sure.''

Strong finish for local Steve Stricker

Some of the loudest cheers at the U.S. Open were reserved for a guy who never really challenged the leaders.

Wisconsin golf fans love home-state favorite Steve Stricker.

He had a pretty good final round, too, shooting a 3-under 69 to finish at 5 under for the tournament. His best finish in 20 U.S. Open appearances came in the first Open to be held in Wisconsin.

There was one last ovation as he walked off the 18th green after putting for par.

''It was really cool. Yeah, I don't get those very often,'' Stricker said. ''And to play well today on top of it was extra special.''

Stricker was rolling down the back end of the back nine, with three birdies between the 14th and 17th holes. He came up short at the par-4-15th , when a 23-foot putt stopped right on the edge of the cup. Stricker tapped in for par.

''Yeah, that would have been nice to get. But can't complain the way I finished it off,'' Stricker said.

He's not slowing down either.

After turning 50 this year, Stricker gets to play in the PGA Tour Champions event that he will host in Madison next weekend, the American Family Insurance Championship.

He's not sure if his wife, Nicki, will repeat as his caddie next week, though.

''She's hurting, I don't know if she'll be able to caddie next week,'' he said. ''But she did well. We had a lot of fun together again.''

Rickie Fowler falls short on Sunday

Rickie Fowler was hoping to wipe away the past. Justin Thomas was hoping to relive it.

Neither got what they were looking for Sunday at the U.S. Open.

The buddies who shared a house near Erin Hills also shared the misery during a wind-swept final round in which they never got themselves into the mix.

As was the case in previous majors where he's contended, Fowler did little to put real pressure on the leaders.

Thomas, looking for more from where his record-setting 63 came from the day before, was out of the hunt by the middle of the front nine.

''Well, it wasn't going to be like yesterday, regardless,'' Thomas said, acknowledging that record-setting days don't come around all that often.

Fowler gave himself a break: ''You kind of have to say, 'Hey, it's a major, I played well this week.'''

Fowler shot even-par 72 to finish at 10 under. That score would have won all but two of the previous 116 renditions of this championship. But rain-softened Erin Hills was a new U.S. Open course and a much different creature than most of the previous hosts. Fowler's 10 under was only good for a fifth-place tie.

Thomas bogeyed three of the first five holes and tied for ninth at 8 under, eight shots out of the lead.

The two Americans, the closest thing to household names and/or favorites on a third-round leaderboard full of players looking for their first major, were left to tip their hat to countryman Brooks Koepka, who played close-to-flawless golf and tied the U.S. Open record in relation to par at 16 under.

''It made me feel a lot better seeing Brooks shoot 5 under,'' Thomas said. ''I would have had to play some pretty spectacular golf to catch him.''

He was spectacular Saturday, never more than when he hit a 3-wood from 300 yards to 8 feet on No. 18 for an eagle putt that he drained to record the 31st score of 63 in major history. His 9 under was the best-ever U.S. Open score in relation to par.

That put him in Sunday's final pairing - a 2:54 p.m. tee time - and Thomas, an early bird, said it was ''bizarre for me,'' hanging around the house he shared with Fowler, trying to avoid the phone, the TV, all that was being written and said about him until it was time to go to the course.

Once he got there, he never got comfortable.

He hit a good putt on No. 2 that got caught the left edge of the cup and spun out, and settled for bogey. A chip on the fourth almost went in, but then trickled back to 4 feet and he blocked the par putt to the right.

''Obviously, that's just one shot, but that was a pretty big turn,'' Thomas said of the bogey on No. 4. ''It went from (maybe) a good save and a tap-in par to now going 2 over through four and really behind the eight ball.''

After his 68 on Saturday put him in contention yet again at a major, Fowler said he was looking forward to what was supposed to be a windier, tougher day at Erin Hills. But he said the wind wreaked havoc with his putts, blowing them off line and putting him in spots where ''getting kind of the right gust at the right time was kind of key.''

Fowler needed 30 putts on Sunday, compared to 24 on Saturday. When he pushed a 30-foot birdie try on No. 12 a full 12 feet past the hole, he set himself up for bogey. It put him at 10 under, three out of the lead, and Fowler never got closer.

It added another less-than-fantastic finish for Fowler at the majors.

He was two back of Jordan Spieth and Bubba Watson heading into the last round at the 2014 Masters but shot 73 and never threatened. He had chances at the British Open and PGA that year, as well, but his play got overshadowed by others. (Sergio Garcia and Phil Mickelson made more memorable runs at Rory McIlroy at those events.). At this year's Masters, he entered the final round trailing by one but shot a 76 and was far from the drama between Garcia and Justin Rose.

A disturbing trend, or just a rough day on the golf course?

''If you look at the negatives too much, you're going to be stuck doing that the whole time,'' Fowler said. ''You have to measure success in different ways, not just by winning, just because that doesn't happen a whole lot.''

Scores

1 USA Brooks Koepka -16 18 -5 67 70 68 67 272
2 USA Brian Harman -13 17 -1 67 70 67 - 204
3 JPN Hideki Matsuyama -12 18 -6 74 65 71 66 276
4 ENG Tommy Fleetwood -11 18 Par 67 70 68 72 277
T5 USA Bill Haas -10 18 -3 72 68 69 69 278
T5 USA Rickie Fowler -10 18 Par 65 73 68 72 278
T5 USA Xander Schauffele -10 18 -3 66 73 70 69 278
8 USA Charley Hoffman -9 18 -1 70 70 68 71 279
T9 USA Brandt Snedeker -8 18 -1 70 69 70 71 280
T9 USA Trey Mullinax -8 18 -4 71 72 69 68 280
T9 USA Justin Thomas -8 17 3 73 69 63 - 205
12 USA J. B. Holmes -7 18 -1 69 69 72 71 281
T13 USA Brendan Steele -6 18 1 71 69 69 73 282
T13 USA Patrick Reed -6 18 2 68 75 65 74 282
T13 KOR Si-Woo Kim -6 18 3 69 70 68 75 282
T16 AUT Bernd Wiesberger -5 18 1 69 72 69 73 283
T16 USA Chez Reavie -5 18 -1 75 65 72 71 283
T16 ENG Eddie Pepperell -5 18 -1 72 71 69 71 283
T16 USA Matt Kuchar -5 18 -4 74 71 70 68 283
T16 USA Steve Stricker -5 18 -3 73 72 69 69 283
T21 SWE David Lingmerth -4 18 -1 73 69 71 71 284
T21 ESP Sergio Garcia -4 18 Par 70 71 71 72 284
T23 USA Jim Furyk -3 18 Par 70 74 69 72 285
T23 USA Kevin Chappell -3 18 -1 74 70 70 71 285
T23 RSA Louis Oosthuizen -3 18 1 74 70 68 73 285
26 ENG Paul Casey -2 18 2 66 71 75 74 286
T27 USA Jamie Lovemark -1 18 3 69 69 74 75 287
T27 AUS Marc Leishman -1 18 3 68 72 72 75 287
T27 USA Russell Henley -1 18 7 71 70 67 79 287
T27 USA Scottie Scheffler -1 18 1 69 74 71 73 287
T27 USA Zach Johnson -1 18 2 71 74 68 74 287
T32 USA Cameron Champ Par 18 4 70 69 73 76 288
T32 USA Kevin Na Par 18 -1 68 76 73 71 288
T32 SCO Martin Laird Par 18 1 72 71 72 73 288
T35 RSA Brandon Stone 1 18 1 70 74 72 73 289
T35 USA Jordan Niebrugge 1 18 -1 73 72 73 71 289
T35 USA Jordan Spieth 1 18 -3 73 71 76 69 289
T35 GER Martin Kaymer 1 18 1 72 69 75 73 289
T35 ENG Matthew Fitzpatrick 1 18 4 70 73 70 76 289
T35 USA Michael Putnam 1 18 3 73 70 71 75 289
T35 USA Webb Simpson 1 18 1 74 71 71 73 289
T42 ENG Andrew Johnston 2 18 3 69 73 73 75 290
T42 USA Jack Maguire 2 18 4 70 73 71 76 290
T42 USA Jonathan Randolph 2 18 3 71 71 73 75 290
T42 ESP Rafael Cabrera Bello 2 18 2 72 73 71 74 290
T46 USA Harris English 3 18 4 71 69 75 76 291
T46 JPN Satoshi Kodaira 3 18 4 73 69 73 76 291
T46 IRL Shane Lowry 3 18 1 71 74 73 73 291
T46 USA Stewart Cink 3 18 -1 74 70 76 71 291
T50 RSA Branden Grace 4 18 5 72 72 71 77 292
T50 USA Gary Woodland 4 18 2 72 73 73 74 292
T50 KOR Meen-Whee Kim 4 18 5 73 70 72 77 292
T53 USA Jason Kokrak 6 18 3 75 70 74 75 294
T53 USA Ryan Brehm 6 18 5 71 74 72 77 294
T55 RSA Ernie Els 7 18 2 70 72 79 74 295
T55 ENG Lee Westwood 7 18 4 69 75 75 76 295
T55 USA William McGirt 7 18 3 70 71 79 75 295
T58 USA Kevin Kisner 8 18 4 74 70 76 76 296
T58 RSA Thomas Aiken 8 18 7 71 71 75 79 296
T60 CAN Adam Hadwin 9 18 8 68 74 75 80 297
T60 USA Keegan Bradley 9 18 5 72 73 75 77 297
T60 GER Stephan Jaeger 9 18 7 71 73 74 79 297
T60 JPN Yusaku Miyazato 9 18 7 72 70 76 79 297
64 USA Kevin Dougherty 10 18 3 71 72 80 75 298
65 USA Daniel Summerhays 12 18 9 73 72 74 81 300
66 USA Talor Gooch 13 18 8 74 71 76 80 301
67 USA Tyler Light 15 18 8 73 72 78 80 303
68 CHN Haotong Li 22 18 12 74 70 82 84 310
CUT USA Kyle Thompson 2 - 72 76 70 - - 146
CUT JPN Yuta Ikeda 2 - 72 72 74 - - 146
CUT USA Pat Perez 2 - 72 76 70 - - 146
CUT SCO Richie Ramsay 2 - 72 73 73 - - 146
CUT USA Peter Uihlein 2 - 72 74 72 - - 146
CUT ENG Justin Rose 2 - 72 72 74 - - 146
CUT USA Mason Andersen 2 - 72 73 73 - - 146
CUT USA Davis Love IV 2 - 72 71 75 - - 146
CUT ENG Ross Fisher 2 - 72 75 71 - - 146
CUT USA Lucas Glover 2 - 72 74 72 - - 146
CUT ENG Chris Wood 3 - 72 73 74 - - 147
CUT AUS Adam Scott 3 - 72 72 75 - - 147
CUT TPE Cheng Tsung Pan 3 - 72 73 74 - - 147
CUT SWE Henrik Stenson 3 - 72 74 73 - - 147
CUT RSA Charl Schwartzel 3 - 72 71 76 - - 147
CUT KOR Byeong-Hun An 3 - 72 71 76 - - 147
CUT USA Maverick McNealy 3 - 72 73 74 - - 147
CUT USA Alex Smalley 3 - 72 73 74 - - 147
CUT USA Ryan Palmer 3 - 72 78 69 - - 147
CUT WAL Bradley Dredge 3 - 72 74 73 - - 147
CUT BEL Thomas Pieters 3 - 72 76 71 - - 147
CUT ITA Francesco Molinari 3 - 72 74 73 - - 147
CUT USA Daniel Miernicki 3 - 72 73 74 - - 147
CUT USA Troy Merritt 4 - 72 74 74 - - 148
CUT USA Bubba Watson 4 - 72 75 73 - - 148
CUT MEX Roberto Diaz 4 - 72 72 76 - - 148
CUT JPN Hideto Tanihara 4 - 72 72 76 - - 148
CUT IRL Paul Dunne 4 - 72 75 73 - - 148
CUT USA Bud Cauley 4 - 72 73 75 - - 148
CUT ENG Tyrrell Hatton 4 - 72 76 72 - - 148
CUT ENG Scott Gregory 4 - 72 75 73 - - 148
CUT USA Dustin Johnson 4 - 72 75 73 - - 148
CUT USA Tyson Alexander 4 - 72 71 77 - - 148
CUT FRA Gregory Bourdy 5 - 72 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA Sean O'Hair 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT NIR Rory McIlroy 5 - 72 78 71 - - 149
CUT USA Sam Ryder 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT JPN Shugo Imahira 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT KOR Jeung-Hun Wang 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT ESP Jon Rahm 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT NIR Graeme McDowell 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT ARG Angel Cabrera 5 - 72 71 78 - - 149
CUT SCO Russell Knox 5 - 72 73 76 - - 149
CUT CHI Joaquin Niemann 5 - 72 74 75 - - 149
CUT FRA Joel Stalter 5 - 72 77 72 - - 149
CUT USA Max Greyserman 5 - 72 76 73 - - 149
CUT AUS Wade Ormsby 6 - 72 75 75 - - 150
CUT USA Chan Kim 6 - 72 74 76 - - 150
CUT USA Brad Dalke 6 - 72 78 72 - - 150
CUT USA Bryson DeChambeau 6 - 72 74 76 - - 150
CUT USA Scott Piercy 6 - 72 72 78 - - 150
CUT USA Jimmy Walker 6 - 72 77 73 - - 150
CUT USA Ted Potter Jr. 6 - 72 74 76 - - 150
CUT ARG Andres Romero 6 - 72 74 76 - - 150
CUT USA Brice Garnett 6 - 72 75 75 - - 150
CUT USA J. T. Poston 6 - 72 78 72 - - 150
CUT SWE Alexander Noren 6 - 72 73 77 - - 150
CUT USA Christopher Crawford 6 - 72 75 75 - - 150
CUT RSA Oliver Bekker 7 - 72 75 76 - - 151
CUT USA Ben Kohles 7 - 72 77 74 - - 151
CUT RSA George Coetzee 7 - 72 72 79 - - 151
CUT ENG Matt Wallace 7 - 72 76 75 - - 151
CUT USA Jason Dufner 7 - 72 76 75 - - 151
CUT CAN Corey Conners 8 - 72 76 76 - - 152
CUT FRA Alexander Levy 8 - 72 77 75 - - 152
CUT VEN Jhonattan Vegas 8 - 72 77 75 - - 152
CUT USA Roberto Castro 8 - 72 76 76 - - 152
CUT ARG Emiliano Grillo 8 - 72 76 76 - - 152
CUT USA Andy Pope 8 - 72 77 75 - - 152
CUT USA Stewart Hagestad 8 - 72 77 75 - - 152
CUT USA Sahith Theegala 8 - 72 77 75 - - 152
CUT USA Daniel Berger 9 - 72 78 75 - - 153
CUT USA Derek Barron 9 - 72 70 83 - - 153
CUT ENG Aaron Rai 9 - 72 73 80 - - 153
CUT USA Gene Sauers 9 - 72 77 76 - - 153
CUT AUS Nick Flanagan 10 - 72 75 79 - - 154
CUT AUS Jason Day 10 - 72 79 75 - - 154
CUT USA John Oda 10 - 72 78 76 - - 154
CUT USA Scott Harvey 10 - 72 78 76 - - 154
CUT USA Garrett Osborn 10 - 72 83 71 - - 154
CUT USA Brian Stuard 12 - 72 81 75 - - 156
CUT USA Roman Robledo 13 - 72 78 79 - - 157
CUT SWE Daniel Chopra 13 - 72 77 80 - - 157
CUT USA Billy Horschel 13 - 72 79 78 - - 157
CUT USA Matthew Campbell 14 - 72 77 81 - - 158
CUT USA Wesley Bryan 15 - 72 76 83 - - 159
CUT USA Walker Lee 20 - 72 81 83 - - 164
RET ENG Danny Willett 9 - 144 81 - - - 81

 





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